Social Security/QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

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By Rosalie Alviar

Social Security Regional Public Affairs Specialist

 

What is a Social Security Statement, and how can I get a copy?

Answer:

Your online Social Security Statement gives you secure and convenient access to your earnings records. It also shows estimates for retirement, disability, and survivors benefits you and your family may be eligible for. You can get your personal Statement online by using your own my Social Security account. If you don’t yet have an account, you can easily create one.

To set up or use your account to get your online Statement, go to www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

We also mail Statements to workers attaining ages 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60 and older, three months prior to their birthday, if they don’t receive Social Security benefits and don’t have a my Social Security account. If you don’t want to wait for your Statement, you can access it online, whatever time of year you need it.

 

My neighbor, who is retired, told me that the income he receives from his part-time job at the local nursery gives him an increase in his Social Security benefits. Is that right?

Answer:

Retirees who return to work after they start receiving benefits may be able to receive a higher benefit based on those earnings. This is because Social Security automatically re-computes the retirement benefit after crediting the additional earnings to the individual’s earnings record.         Learn more by reading the publication, How Work Affects Your Benefits, at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs.

 

I plan to retire soon. When will my monthly Social Security benefits be paid?

Answer:

Social Security benefits are paid each month. Generally, new retirees receive their benefits on either the second, third, or fourth Wednesday of each month, depending on the day in the month the retiree was born. If you receive benefits as a spouse, your benefit payment date will be determined by your spouse’s birth date.

For a calendar showing actual payment dates, see the Schedule of Social Security Benefit Payments at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/calendar.htm.

 

Can I get both Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security benefits based on my disability?

Answer:

Many people eligible for Social Security disability benefits also may be eligible for SSI. The disability decision for one program is the same for the other, but you must meet additional resource and income limits to qualify for SSI benefits. Learn all about SSI and whether or not you may qualify by reading the publication, You May Be Able To Get Supplemental Security Income (SSI) at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs.

 

Is there a time limit on collecting Social Security disability benefits?

Answer:

Your disability benefits will continue as long as your medical condition does not improve and you remain unable to work. We will review your case at regular intervals to make sure you are still disabled. If you are still receiving disability benefits when you reach full retirement age, we will automatically convert them to retirement benefits. Learn more by reading our publication, Disability Benefits, at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs.

 

Will my eligibility for the Extra Help with Medicare prescription drug plan costs be reviewed and, if so, how often?

Answer:

If you get the Extra Help, Social Security may contact you to review your status. This reassessment will ensure you remain eligible for Extra Help and you are receiving all the benefits you deserve. Annually, usually at the end of August, we may send you a form to complete: Social Security Administration Review of Your Eligibility for Extra Help. You will have 30 days to complete and return this form. Any necessary adjustments to the Extra Help will be effective in January of the following year. Go to www.socialsecurity.gov/prescriptionhelp for more information.

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